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The New Stuff

I (Alexis Gilding) am an underwater photographer born in Venezuela and photography is my greatest passion.

I have had the chance to dive in wonderful and different places, such as Galapagos, Bahamas, Yucatan Peninsula, Coiba, Bonaire, the Canary Islands and most recently – Indonesia.  In the latter I visited the amazing underwater world.

For me, Lembeh Strait (Indonesia) is the best place for underwater macro photography in the whole world. The diversity of tiny species from nudibranchs and frog fishes to the most venomous octopus in the world just makes every diving spot there magical.

While "muck diving" in Indonesia, I saw many weird creatures using camouflage as their weapon to survive.

Amazing Underwater Creatures



Geology, or the study of the Earth's rocks and how they were formed, is all around us, but there are some unique and bizarre occurrences that scientists have rushed to explain. Here is a list of some of the weird and wonderful geological discoveries, some of which remain a mystery to scientists and nature-lovers alike.
The Wave, Arizona

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This gorgeous sandstone rock formation near the Arizona-Utah border naturally took on this wave-like formation about 190 million years ago. Today, it is famous among hikers and photographers for its colorful forms and the rugged, trackless hike that leads to it.

Door to Hell, Turkmenistan

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A natural gas field in Derweze, Turkmenistan, this fiery pit was created following a drilling accident in a gas mine, which left a huge crater.

Rainforest Sinkhole, Venezuela

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Located in the center of Jaua Sarisarinama National Park in Venezuela, this sinkhole is a natural depression in the Earth's surface. The sinkhole has a completely isolated and different forest ecosystem at its bottom.

The Puente del Inca, Argentina

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"The Inca's Bridge" is a natural arch that forms a bridge over the Vacas River. The 'bridge' was most likely formed when cold and hot elements interacted millions of years ago, creating a path for sulfurous water that left behind a colorful trail.

Bryce Amphitheatre, Utah

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Although this may look like another canyon, it is actually a natural amphitheater because the rock formation is steep enough to amplify sounds and echoes. Bryce is known for its distinctive geological structures called hoodoos, formed by frost weathering and stream erosion of a river and lake many years ago.

Trona Pinnacles, Sierra Nevada

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This unusual landscape located in the California Desert National Conservation Area consists of over 500 tufa spires, or porous rock forms created when springs interact with bodies of water. Some of the spires reach a height of nearly 140 feet (43 meters)!

Champagne Pool, New Zealand

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Wouldn't it be wonderful to bathe in champagne? Well that's not exactly what this geothermal lake in the North Island of New Zealand is. It is actually a colorful hot spring with a surface temperature of nearly 74 degrees Celsius, with carbon dioxide bubbling on the surface.

Tsingy de Bemaraha Strict Nature Reserve, Madagascar

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A series of carpet limestone pinnacles in the Northern part of Madagascar. The nature reserve is also known for its unique mangrove forests, and wild bird and lemur populations.

Badwater Salt Flats, California

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Located in an area known as Death Valley, this is the lowest point in North America, with an elevation of -282 ft. below sea level (86 m).

The Great Blue Hole, Belize

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A large submarine sinkhole that measures over 984 feet across and 407 feet deep (300 X 124m), the Blue Hole was formed during a glacial period when sea levels were much lower. It is famed in history and literature as an area so shallow that most boats don't make it out.

Hiller Lake, Australia

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Located in Western Australia, scientists are still unable to explain the pink color of the lake, although they have proven that it is not due to the presence of algae. Most likely, the color is due to some geochemical that has yet to be explained, possible Pepto Bismol?

Ball Pyramid, Australia

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The world's largest sea stack measuring in at 1843 feet (562 meters) and formed through a process of coastal geomorphology that took place many thousands of years ago when the continents were shaped as we know them today.

Elephant Rock, Nevada

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In the Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, this naturally occurring sandstone rock formation looks very much like an elephant.

Crater Lake, Oregon

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This beautiful, frigid lake was formed only 150 years ago by the collapse of the volcano Mount Mazama.

The Peculiar Pinnacles, Australia

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Also located in Western Australia are these amazing natural limestone structures that were formed about 25,000-30,000 years ago when the sea receded leaving deposits of shells.

The Sliding Stones, California

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Another of Death Valley's natural wonders, these sliding stone have gained fame as one of the 'inexplicable' mysteries of our time. The assumption is that the rocks were moved across an ancient sea floor and that their tracks remained imprinted.

The Moeraki Boulders, New Zealand

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These gigantic boulders began forming on the ocean floor and now have made their way to the coastline where they are beginning to erode.

The Beauty Pool, Wyoming

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Within Yellowstone National Park, this hot spring contains different kinds of algae and bacteria species which flourish and create this vivid array of colors.

 Timothy P.

Some, Quite Bizarre, Geological Occurances...


 


The best views that money can buy in London: Photographer captures stunning skyline views from multi-million pound flats

  • Among the views is what Lord Archer can see from his multi-million pound penthouse on the Albert Embankment 
  • Resulting image features in new book with other views from public spots and private apartments across the capital
  • Further views include east from Battersea, north from Greenwich, south from Primrose Hill and east from The Mall 




This is the best that London's skyline has to offer - in 16 outstanding panoramic photographs of the capital as you've never seen it before.
Graham Charlie Edwards took the spectacular pictures from a mixture of public spots and private flats, from the City to Primrose Hill, for a new book.
It features what could be the best view from any London home - the one enjoyed by Jeffrey Archer, from his Albert Embankment penthouse.

Along the Thames: This is the astonishing view of central London from Lord Archer's penthouse flat on the Albert Embankment

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North from Bankside: The Millenium Bridge and St Paul's Cathedral - which is on Ludgate Hill, the City of London's highest point

East from Waterloo Bridge: Photographer Graham Charles Edwards says this is widely regarded as the finest street-level view in London

East from Aldwych: The Leadenhall Building (centre left), or 'Cheesegrater' and 20 Fenchurch Street, or 'The Walkie-Talkie' (centre right)

South from Tower Hill: Tower Bridge (right), built in 1894, and the Tower of London, which has parts dating back nearly 1,000 years
The view from Lord Archer's multi-million pound flat next the River Thames takes in the likes of Big Ben, the Houses of Parliament and the London Eye.
Mr Edwards, 52, of Knightsbridge, told MailOnline: 'I noticed him talking in his apartment, and he likes to sit on a sofa with that view behind him.

'I dropped off a mock-up of my book before it was printed, and asked him, "do you think I could come up and take a view from your penthouse"?
'To my astonishment he agreed. I waited for a good day, and I went up there and I spent an amazing hour taking pictures. He's got a 360-degree view.

East from The Mall: Trafalgar Square and English Chinese Anglican church St Martin-in-the-Fields built in 1722 can be seen to the left

North-east from St James's: The London Eye is bathed in blue light along with the Shell Centre on the South Bank at night

North from Shad Thames: This part of London was badly damaged during the Blitz. The old News International can be seen (back right)

Looking east from Battersea: The striking landmark of Battersea Power Station, with the train tracks into Victoria station to the left

South from Primrose Hill: This vantage point rises to 256ft (78m), giving a outstanding panoramic view across the capital city
'When I had the book printed, I sent a copy to him - and he asked me for three more, which he bought from me. If you don't ask, you don't get.'
The penthouse owned by Lord Archer - who has bought three copies of Mr Edwards's book - is on a peninsula giving stunning views along the river.
Mr Edwards has been working on the book of panoramic photographs for five years, and spoke to various people about gaining access to their flats.
Six of the images were taken from private homes, with Mr Edwards wanting to study rare views of the London skyline that the public cannot usual see.



East from Pimlico: The MI6 Building used in James Bond films can be seen to the left, with the St George Wharf development to the right

North-east from Nine Elms: The office block to the left is the 1963 Millbank Tower, and Vauxhall Bridge can be seen across the river

North from Greenwich Park: This image provides a financial view of London with the City on the left and Canary Wharf on the right

South from Clerkenwell: The brutalist Barbican Centre is pictured centre left, while the Old Bailey criminal court can be seen on the right

East from Cheyne Walk: The Albert Bridge, which has had many structural problems since being buit in 1873, is seen in the late evening

South-west from Battersea Bridge: This view of the capital includes the luxury Belvedere Tower at Chelsea Harbour (tall building, right)
Other views featured in the book include looking east from Battersea, north from Greenwich and south from Primrose Hill.
Also to be seen in the self-published book are views north from Bankside, east from The Mall, south from Clerkenwell and east from Pimlico.
Lord Archer, 74, is notorious for being jailed for four years in 2001 after being found guilty of perjury and perverting the course of justice.
His apartment is in a building which has an average flat value of £2.8million. The book, London Vistas, is available for £25 by clicking here.

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What a view: Lord Archer and his wife Lady Mary Archer pose in the stunning penthouse for a Daily Mail photoshoot earlier this year

London Panorama Views


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